GLOBAL SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

SHE Level 5
SCQF Credit Points 15.00
ECTS Credit Points 7.50
Module Code MMN224966
Module Leader Artur Steiner
School Glasgow School for Business and Society
Subject Management
Trimesters
  • A (September start)
  • B (January start)
  • C (May start)

Summary of Content

Increasing attention is being paid to social entrepreneurship as a means to tackle entrenched social problems such as unemployment, social exclusion and poverty. Foundations such as Ashoka and Skoll have paved the way in introducing the concept to the world. Policy makers have responded accordingly: In the United States an Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation has been created within the White House; At the European level the EU has created a Social Business Initiative to help create a favourable environment for social entrepreneurship. Some commentators suggest that we have now entered a social innovation paradigm whereby social entrepreneurs are tackling the problems that have proved beyond government and traditional charity. This module introduces the student to the concept of social entrepreneurship (and related concepts of social enterprise and social innovation). The notion of social entrepreneurship as a contested concept with competing definitions pushed by different actors with different (political) agendas is developed. Students are taught to critically assess these different agendas and to gain a broader understanding of social entrepreneurship by placing it within the wider social, economic and political contexts in which it occurs. The course aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills to make up their own minds as to whether (and how) business can change the world, and to prepare them to enter a world where business and society are intertwined. Summary of how PRME-related issues / topics are covered in this module: This module critically engages with the principles for responsible management education. The module is wholly focused around the PRME related topic of social entrepreneurship. A primary focus is the role of business (positive and negative) in creating social value. Internationalisation: This module aims to engage students with internationally informed social entrepreneurship research; to purposefully develop understanding of international perspectives of social entrepreneurship and to move beyond traditional dominant paradigms in teaching students to think creatively and critically.

Syllabus

The syllabus is organised with a weekly lecture/seminar pattern as follows: (11 weeks) BLOCK 1 INTRODUCTION: THE POLITICS OF SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP BLOCK 2 POPULAR CONCEPTIONS OF SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP BLOCK 3 ALTERNATIVE CONCEPTIONS OF SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP BLOCK 4: SOCIAL CHANGE

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, the student should be able to:- Appraise and critically assess the contested concept of social entrepreneurship- Identify the range of contexts in which social entrepreneurship can take place- Analyse what is meant by social change- Evaluate the circumstances in which business can play a role in driving positive social change- Develop critical thinking skills- Reflect on how the skills they have learnt during their degree programme might be applied to creating social change

Teaching / Learning Strategy

The module will be delivered in 36 lectures and seminars. In addition, 8 hours of tutor-led activities will be delivered using applied learning strategies. Overview: Learning and teaching will be carried out through lectures, guest lectures, seminars and visits to social ventures. Guest speakers will provide examples of different approaches to social entrepreneurship. Case studies, journal articles and book chapters will be used as a basis for discussion and debate. Use will be made of GCU Learn to provide additional module material. Lectures: Lectures will be designed around the latest research findings. Key concepts will be introduced alongside theories purporting to explain their evolution. Where appropriate lectures will be given by research active lecturers and social entrepreneurs who are leaders in their field. Academics and PhD students from the Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health will play a key role in delivering lectures on social entrepreneurship and micro-finance, and assisting with tutorials. Seminars: Contact based seminars delivered in partnership with the Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health. The seminars will be structured around key articles in the research literature related to the lecture topics. Assessment: The assessment strategy encourages students to reflect critically on academic literature, and more specifically on the concept of social entrepreneurship. During seminars students will be given regular feedback on their management of seminar tasks. Essay marks and electronic feedback will normally be provided within 3 working weeks of submission. In addition, students may seek further advice from members of the teaching team. GSBS will continue to use the advancement of GCU Learn as a blended learning tool through its teaching and learning as well as through engagement with students. GSBS will ensure that all modules are GCU Learn enabled and with the support of the Learning Technologists at the cutting edge of development of online materials. Academic staff and the Learning Technologists will continue to work together to develop and operate all modules on GCU Learn to ensure student support and information sharing. Students are provided with formative and summative feedback via a variety of mechanisms. Feedback on coursework is provided within 3 working weeks of submission.

Indicative Reading

Core Text: Nicholls, A. (ed.) (2008) Social Entrepreneurship: New Models of Sustainable Social Change. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Bornstein, D. 2007. How to change the world: Social entrepreneurs and the power of new ideas. Light, P. 2009. The search for social entrepreneurship. Brookings Institution Press Nicholls, A. 2008. Social Entrepreneurship: New Models of Sustainable Social Change. Ziegler, R. 2009. An introduction to social entrepreneurship: Voices, preconditions, contexts. Edward Elgar Publishing. Young, D. 2013. If not for profit for what? GSU Publications. <http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/facbooks2013/1/> Books Bornstein, D. 2007. How to change the world: Social entrepreneurs and the power of new ideas. Light, P. 2009. The search for social entrepreneurship. Brookings Institution Press Nicholls, A. 2008. Social Entrepreneurship: New Models of Sustainable Social Change. Ziegler, R. 2009. An introduction to social entrepreneurship: Voices, preconditions, contexts. Edward Elgar Publishing. Young, D. 2013. If not for profit for what? GSU Publications. <http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/facbooks2013/1/> Journal articles -720 Amin, A., Cameron, A., and Hudson, R. 2003. The alterity of the social economy. In Leyshon, A et al. Alternative Economic Spaces. Dacin, P.A., Dacin,M.T., and Matear, M. 2010. Social entrepreneurship: why we don't need a new theory and how we move forward from here, The Academy of Management Perspectives, 24(3): 37-57. Dees, J.G. Taking social entrepreneurship seriously, Society, 44(3): 24-31. -720 Dees, G. (1998), The Meaning of "Social Entrepreneurship", Graduate School of Business, Stanford University. Defourny, J and Nyssens, M, 2010. Conceptualisations of social enterprise and entrepreneurship in Europe and the United States: Convergences and Differences, Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, 1(1): 32-53. Dey, P and Steyaert, C. 2010.The politics of narrating social entrepreneurship, Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, 4(1): 85-108. -720 Di Domenico, M., Haugh, H., and Tracey, P. 2010. Social Bricolage: Theorizing Social Value Creation in Social Enterprises, Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 34(4): 681-703. Evers, A. 1995. Part of the welfare mix: The third sector as an intermediate area, Voluntas, 6(2): 159-182. Fligstein, N. and McAdam, D. 2011. Toward a General Theory of Strategic Action Fields, Sociological Theory, 29(1): 1-26. Jessop, B. 1999. The changing governance of welfare: recent trends in its primary functions, scale, and modes of coordination, Social Policy and Administration, 33(4): 348-359. Kanter, R.M. 1999. From spare change to real change: the social sector as a BETA site for business innovation, Harvard Business Review, May-June 1999. -720 Kickul, J. et al. 2012. Social Business Education: An Interview With Nobel Laureate Muhammad Yunus, Academy of Management Learning & Education, 11(3): 453-462. -720 Light, P. 2009. The search for social entrepreneurship, Brookings Institution Press. Nicholls, A. 2010. The Legitimacy of Social Entrepreneurship: Reflexive Isomorphism in a Pre-Paradigmatic Field, Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 34(4): 611-633 Porter, M. and Kramer, M.R. 2011. The Big Idea: Creating Shared Value, Harvard Business Review, Jan-Feb. <http://www.professoralanross.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/The-Big-Idea_-Creating-Shared-Value-Harvard-Business-Review.pdf> Schreiner, M., and Woller, G. 2003. Microenterprise Programs in the United States and in the Developing World, World Development, 31(9): 1567-1580. Seelos, C., and Mair, J. 2005. Social entrepreneurship: Creating new business models to serve the poor, Business Horizons, 48(3): 241-246. Teasdale, S. 2012. What's in a name? Making sense of social enterprise discourses, Public Policy and Adminsitration, 27(2): 99-119 Teasdale, S. et al. 2011. Exploring gender and social entrepreneurship: women's leadership, employment and participation in the third sector and social enterprises, Voluntary Sector Review, 2(1): 57076. -720 Yunus, M., Moingeon, B., and Lehmann-Ortega, L. 2010. Building Social Business Models: Lessons from the Grameen Experience, Long Range Planning, 43(2-3): 308-325. -720 Zahra SA, Gedajlovic E, Neubaum D, Shulman J. 2009. A typology of social entrepreneurs: motives, search processes and ethical challenges. Journal of Business Venturing, 24(5): 519-532. Ziegler, R. 2009. An introduction to social entrepreneurship: Voices, preconditions, contexts. Edward Elgar Publishing. Zahra SA, Gedajlovic E, Neubaum D, Shulman J. 2009. A typology of social entrepreneurs: motives, search processes and ethical challenges. Journal of Business Venturing, 24(5): 519-532. Journals Entrepreneurship, Theory and Practice Journal of Social Entrepreneurship Social Enterprise Journal Stanford Social Innovation Review -180 Additional reading materials will be drawn from online resources.

Transferrable Skills

By the end of this module students will have gained competence in the following key areas: Understanding of the rapidly developing field of social entrepreneurship, and the skills to apply this to different fields. Critical thinking and analysis Understanding of complex 'real world' social problems Self awareness and the ability to reflect on their own (and others) practice Thorough grounding for postgraduate study

Module Structure

Activity Total Hours
Lectures (FT) 24.00
Assessment (FT) 40.00
Seminars (FT) 12.00
Independent Learning (FT) 74.00

Assessment Methods

Component Duration Weighting Threshold Description
Course Work 01 n/a 40.00 45% Individual. Critically evaluate and compare and contrast two articles from the reading list (to be confirmed with your tutor) (2000 words).
Course Work 02 n/a 60.00 45% Individual Essay (2500 words)