Transforming diabetic foot care in India

10 April 2012

Transforming diabetic foot care in India

Christine Skinner with Professor Stuart Baird

A GCU team has returned from a visit to India to train the country’s physicians how to manage the care of 50million diabetics.
India has more diabetics than anywhere else in the world and the condition has been identified as a pandemic across the region.
The loss of sensation and poor blood supply to the feet and legs caused by diabetes contribute to high levels of amputation 
Professor Stuart Baird and Christine Skinner, of the School of Health and Life Sciences, recently travelled to India to work with staff from Calicut’s Institute of Palliative Medicine and Trivandum’s Kerala Institute of Medical Sciences.
The GCU team, who previously acted as World Health Organisation consultants in diabetic foot disease, held workshops with India’s physicians to outline how to assess and manage the complications caused by the condition.
Professor Baird said: “Diabetes is a huge problem in India, and its complications - such as lack of sensation and poor blood supply - can lead to gangrene and amputation, which is devastating for individuals and a huge burden on the health care system.
“There is a limited knowledge base and expertise in India and physicians have little understanding of the vital early identification, detection and management of diabetic foot disease, which is considered as the major risk factor in non-traumatic limb amputation worldwide.”

Two health experts from GCU have held teaching workshops in India designed to improve the care of 50million diabetics.

India has more diabetics than anywhere else in the world and the condition has been identified as a pandemic across the region.

The loss of sensation and poor blood supply to the feet and legs caused by diabetes contribute to high levels of amputation 

Professor Stuart Baird and Christine Skinner, of the School of Health and Life Sciences, recently travelled to India to work with staff from Calicut’s Institute of Palliative Medicine and Trivandum’s Kerala Institute of Medical Sciences.

The GCU team, who previously acted as World Health Organisation consultants in diabetic foot disease, held workshops with India’s physicians to outline how to assess and manage the complications caused by the condition.

Dr P Mohamad Ali, Chair of the Mfar Group and Chair of Glasgow Caledonian University’s partner in Oman, Caledonian College of Engineering, funded the workshops. Dr Ali said: “Glasgow Caledonian University is one of the top universities in Scotland and has one of the biggest health schools in the UK, which has specific expertise in Diabetic Foot Management. I am pleased to sponsor this initiative and I am delighted that the university has agreed to send its eminent professors across the continent to train our physicians and medical staff to effectively manage and deal with the complications related to diabetics.”

Professor Baird said: “Diabetes is a huge problem in India, and its complications - such as lack of sensation and poor blood supply - can lead to gangrene and amputation, which is devastating for individuals and a huge burden on the health care system.

“There is a limited knowledge base and expertise in India and physicians have little understanding of the vital early identification, detection and management of diabetic foot disease, which is considered as the major risk factor in non-traumatic limb amputation worldwide.”

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