Accessing the University Careers Service

The careers service is a great place to start the process of deciding what you want to do with your future, even when you might not know what the next steps are. Careers advisers often see students who have no idea what they want to do after university. They can help piece together a plan for you based on your interests and qualifications. The career advisers are experienced in working with students with disabilities and can give you practical and realistic advice on questions you have relating to your disability such as; disclosing disabilities in the workplace, and reasonable adjustments - both for the interview stages and when you have started in your new role. The careers service also helps with preparing for interviews, practicing psychometric tests and of course help with writing graduate CV’s and application forms.

I have a disability and there’s so many questions I have about disclosing it, would the careers service be able to help me with this?

Yes. The careers service is knowledgeable about impairment specific questions as well as general advice for interviews. They are happy to give you realistic and practical advice about disclosing your disability ahead of an interview and, how to ask for reasonable adjustments for the day of the interview, if you think you would need any. 

I’ve got my first interview coming up and I have no idea what to expect, is there a way to practice in advance?

Yes. The Careers service offers practice interview appointments where you can get tips on your interview skills and get insider knowledge of what your interviewer is looking for. To find out more about practice interviews and to book your appointment, click here.

I’ve got no idea what I want to do after university and I’m graduating soon. What can I do?

You don’t have to have a plan in your head to see a careers adviser. They can help students figure out what they would like to do with their future based on your interests and qualifications. They are very knowledgeable of each industry and will help you piece together a plan which will start you off on a path to employment or further study, if this is what you wish.  

I’m nervous with meeting new people and easily distracted. Can I bring someone with me to the meeting?

Yes, you can bring anyone along to the meeting with you. Some students like to bring their Disability Mentor along to take notes, so you can look back on them at home. Other students may like to bring their peers or parents to the meeting. Just let your career adviser know there’s someone coming with you when you book the appointment.

I live quite far away, so travelling to the campus is expensive. Are there any other options available to speak to a careers adviser?

Yes. You can request either an email or telephone meeting with the careers adviser when you make the initial appointment. This is great for students who live far away from campus or students who are anxious about meeting with a careers adviser face to face.

In the meantime

You might decide that some time out is needed before you start applying for jobs or future study. Volunteering is a great option to keep you busy whilst maintaining valuable social and employability skills. Volunteering will not only make your CV look more attractive to future employers, it will help boost your confidence in a work place environment.

Do-it has a wide range of volunteering opportunities to suit many interests. To view what’s on offer in your area, click here.

Volunteer Scotland has volunteering opportunities all over Scotland and you can find out what’s available in your area by clicking here.

Transitioning to work

The National Autistic Society has the Moving Forward course which helps people gain the confidence they need to get into the workplace. The course includes group sessions and a placement, as well as up to 6 months of support with the transition into work. This course has some requirements you need to meet to be able to apply. To gain a place, you need to be;

  • Ages 16-24
  • Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Live in an eligible postcode
  • You cannot be in employment, training or education

For more information on this course and the requirements to gain a place, click here.