GCU hosts major research conference

29 August 2011

GCU hosts major research conference
Re-vitae-lising part-time research 
Glasgow Caledonian University was the main sponsor and venue for the second Part-Time Researcher Conference, led by the Vitae Scotland Northern Ireland Hub in partnership with universities across Scotland and Northern Ireland. 
Part-time researchers from across Scotland and Northern Ireland came together for a productive day of networking, skills workshops and support and information from service providers. 
Participatory workshops on training and development themes, such as creativity, entrepreneurship and writing, were delivered by specialist staff and tailored to part-time needs. An extended networking lunch and evening reception gave delegates the chance to share experiences with their fellow researchers and visit information stands.  
Dr Amy Cartwright, Vitae Scotland Northern Ireland, Hub Coordinator explains: “Many researchers in a part-time capacity are trying to juggle their roles with other responsibilities, such as jobs and childcare. They can often feel isolated in their field and like they are missing out on opportunities available to researchers in full-time roles. In consultation with HEIs across the region, we decided to hold this conference to give them the opportunity to come together, share their experiences, build up contacts and learn new skills. Last year’s conference sponsored by the University of Edinburgh was such a success that it was decided to make it an annual event, and we’re looking forward to holding next year’s at Stirling University.”
Professor Bonnie Steves, Director of GCU’s Graduate School, says: “At GCU, half of our research students are part-time, as are many of our research contract staff, so we’re used to addressing the needs and requirements of this group. Research can often be seen as the ‘invisible’ activity for part-time researchers, yet it’s such a valuable part of what they do. We’re hoping that this day gave delegates the chance to focus on their skills, and go back to work feeling inspired and proud of their role as researchers.”
Feedback from participants showed that the conference had achieved its objectives. “I’m so pleased I signed up! I’ve met a lot of people today, who all have different research backgrounds to my own, so finding out more about their research subjects and how they work has been really interesting. A truly excellent day.”

Glasgow Caledonian University was the main sponsor and venue for the second Part-Time Researcher Conference, led by the Vitae Scotland Northern Ireland Hub in partnership with universities across Scotland and Northern Ireland. 

Part-time researchers from across Scotland and Northern Ireland came together for a productive day of networking, skills workshops and support and information from service providers. 

Participatory workshops on training and development themes, such as creativity, entrepreneurship and writing, were delivered by specialist staff and tailored to part-time needs. An extended networking lunch and evening reception gave delegates the chance to share experiences with their fellow researchers and visit information stands.  

Dr Amy Cartwright, Vitae Scotland Northern Ireland, Hub Coordinator explains: “Many researchers in a part-time capacity are trying to juggle their roles with other responsibilities, such as jobs and childcare. They can often feel isolated in their field and like they are missing out on opportunities available to researchers in full-time roles.

“In consultation with HEIs across the region, we decided to hold this conference to give them the opportunity to come together, share their experiences, build up contacts and learn new skills. Last year’s conference sponsored by the University of Edinburgh was such a success that it was decided to make it an annual event, and we’re looking forward to holding next year’s at Stirling University.”

Professor Bonnie Steves, Director of GCU’s Graduate School, says: “At GCU, half of our research students are part-time, as are many of our research contract staff, so we’re used to addressing the needs and requirements of this group. Research can often be seen as the ‘invisible’ activity for part-time researchers, yet it’s such a valuable part of what they do. We’re hoping that this day gave delegates the chance to focus on their skills, and go back to work feeling inspired and proud of their role as researchers.”

Feedback from participants showed that the conference had achieved its objectives. “I’m so pleased I signed up! I’ve met a lot of people today, who all have different research backgrounds to my own, so finding out more about their research subjects and how they work has been really interesting. A truly excellent day.”

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