Recognition as GCU helps teachers in the fight against cyber crime

20 October 2016

The Scottish Cyber Awards were set up to recognise Scotland's commitment towards cyber security excellence.

The Scottish Cyber Awards were set up to recognise Scotland's commitment towards cyber security excellence.

A Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) project, through which students are helping school teachers and school pupils learn the importance of cyber security and resilience, has been shortlisted for an award.

The University is one of three finalists in the Community Impact category of the first Scottish Cyber Awards, set up to recognise Scotland's commitment towards cyber security excellence.

The shortlisted project saw third-year Digital Security students work with schools across Scotland to support teachers in the delivery of the SQA National Progression Awards (NPAs) in Cyber Security.

Taking into account limited resources in schools, as well as the range in levels of understanding of cyber security of both teachers and pupils, the students worked together to design lecture, lab and tutorial materials that addressed the learning outcomes of the NPAs. The result was the development of seven lesson plans, which have been made available via the Education Scotland website, giving teachers free, easy access to the materials.

Assistant head of department Jackie Riley said: “To be shortlisted for the award is a great honour, and validation of the work we are doing at GCU. The creation of a resilient nation in terms of cyber security has to start at grass roots and through this project school pupils will become the foundation of our resilience.

“The students involved in the project have had experience of a real-world problem, working as consultants, which will be invaluable to them after they graduate.”

The winner will be announced at the final of the Scottish Cyber Awards in Edinburgh on November 16.

At the awards dinner, GCU will be represented by Kenny Ovens, module leader; Jackie Riley; and three of the students who worked on the project: Anja Amundsen, Steven Ryland and Ryan Kane all from the BEng Digital Security, Forensics and Ethical Hacking programme.