Benefits and drawbacks

Creative works

Benefits
  • Development of new media opens new opportunities.
  • The rise in social media means some formats, like recorded performance, are now far easier to disseminate world wide.
  • It is easier to engage a wider audience, beyond academia, and demonstrate public engagement or social impact.
Drawbacks
  • Output from research-active performance or live arts departments is often technically complex, multimedia data. Commonly this valuable work is the only remaining trace of ephemeral events, so there are concerns about holding a permanent record.
  • It can be difficult to archive and share with others over time, as technical formats change.
  • It can be a problem to deposit outputs in institutional repositories, because of the format and size of files.
  • Citation counts are difficult to measure.
An artist's point of view

Steve Dutton Professor of Creative Practice at Coventry University, talks about promoting work in the visual arts. When you are watching it, think about whether any of the advice he gives is true for your own discipline as well. Steve mentions Axis, the Contempory Arts Database.

Promoting Your Work in the Visual Arts

Copyright ©2013 East Midlands Research Group

Steve Dutton Professor of Creative Practice at Coventry University, talks about promoting work in the visual arts. When you are watching it, think about whether any of the advice he gives is true for your own discipline as well. Steve mentions Axis, the Contempory Arts Database.

Creative Commons License
PILOT - Communication by Marion Kelt, GCU, Imperial College, London and East Midlands Research Group is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.