Accident/Near Miss Reporting

All accidents and near misses must be recorded on the Incident/Near Miss Form (S1e)  and sent to the People Services Department by internal post or by e-mail to hsforms@gcu.ac.uk as soon as possible and preferably within 24 hours.

The information provided on the accident form is held by People Services and used in relation to the Universities legal requirements and for improving health and safety management such as investigating accidents and producing statistics. The accident form is supplied to Schools and Departments for the same purpose.

If sensitive information is contained on the form, please ensure you follow the University Guidance on handling sensitive information.

Completed accident forms may contain sensitive information therefore in order to comply with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) 2018, a master copy will be retained securely within People Services in line with any obligations under health and safety legislation and GDPR. 

Schools and Departments must ensure that copies of accident forms (either electronically or paper) are kept confidential and securely stored within the School or Department for 3 years and then confidentially destroyed.

There are certain work-related injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences that the University must report to the Health and Safety Executive. If any of these apply, in addition to completing the incident/near miss form the University Health and Safety Advisor must be contacted immediately by emailing hsforms@gcu.ac.uk or by phoning extension 8255. 

Further information can be found in the Accident and Near Miss Reporting Procedure

RIDDOR Reportable Definitions

For absence or unable to perform normal work duties following a work-related accident:

Over-seven-day incapacitation

Accidents must be reported to the HSE where they result in a member of staff being absent from work, or unable to perform their normal work duties, for more than seven consecutive days as the result of their injury. This seven day period does not include the day of the accident, but does include weekends and rest days.

Over-three-day incapacitation

Accidents must be recorded, but not reported to the HSE where they result in a member of staff  being incapacitated for more than three consecutive days.

Specific Injuries

Where any person at work, as a result of a work-related accident, suffers:

  • Any bone fracture, diagnosed by a registered medical practitioner, other than to a finger, thumb or toe
  • Amputation of an arm, hand, finger, thumb, leg, foot or toe
    Any injury diagnosed by a registered medical practitioner as being likely to cause permanent blinding or reduction in sight in one or both eyes
  • Any crush injury to the head or torso causing damage to the brain or internal organs in the chest or abdomen
  • Any burn injury (including scalding) which covers more than 10% of the whole body’s total surface area or causes significant damage to the eyes, respiratory system or other vital organs
  • Any degree of scalping requiring hospital treatmentLoss of consciousness caused by a head injury or asphyxia
  • Any other injury arising from working in an enclosed space which leads to hypothermia or heat-induced illness or required resuscitation or admittance to hospital for more than 24 hours

 
Injuries to non-workers

Work-related accidents involving members of the public or people who are not at work must be reported if the person suffers an injury, and that person is taken from the site of the accident to a hospital for treatment in respect of that injury.

 

Occupational Disease

Where in relation to a person at work, a diagnosis from a registered medical practitioner (in writing for staff) is received of:

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, where the person’s work involves regular use of percussive or vibrating tools
    Cramp in the hand or forearm, where the person’s work involves prolonged periods of repetitive movement of the fingers, hand or arm
  • Occupational dermatitis, where the person’s work involves significant or exposure to a known skin sensitizer or irritant
  • Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome, where the person’s work involves regular use of percussive or vibrating tools, or the holding of materials which are subject to percussive processes, or processes causing vibration
  • Occupational asthma, where the person’s work involves significant or regular exposure to a known respiratory sensitizer

Tendonitis or tenosynovitis in the hand or forearm, where the person’s work is physically demanding and involves frequent, repetitive movements

Exposure to carcinogens, mutagens and biological agents

Where, in relation to a person at work, a diagnosis from a registered medical practitioner (in writing for staff) is received of:

  • Any cancer attributed to an occupational exposure to a known human carcinogen or mutagen (including ionising radiation)
  • Any disease attributed to an occupational exposure to a biological agent

Work-related fatalities

  • Where any person dies as a result of a work-related accident
  • Where any person dies as a result of occupational exposure to a biological agent
  • Where a member of staff has suffered a reportable injury which is the cause of his/her death within one year of the accident date

Dangerous Occurence

  • Lifting equipment - the collapse, overturning or failure of any load-bearing part of any lifting equipment, other than an accessory for lifting
  • Pressure systems – the failure of any closed vessel or of any associated pipework (other than a pipeline) forming part of a pressure system as defined by regulation 2(1) of the Pressure Systems safety Regulations 2000(a), where that failure could cause the death of any person
  • Overhead electric lines – any plant or equipment coming into contact with uninsulated overhead power lines in which the voltage exceeds 200 volts or being in close proximity such that it causes an electrical discharge
  • Electrical – any explosion or fire caused by an electrical short circuit or overload which results in the stoppage of the plant involved for more than 24 hours or causes significant risk of death
  • Explosives – any unintentional fire, explosion or ignition (further details can be found in the Regulations or by contacting the University Health and Safety Advisor)
  • Biological agents - any accident or incident which results or could have resulted in the release or escape of a biological agent likely to cause severe human infection or illness.
  • Radiation generators and radiography:
    • the malfunction of a radiation generator or its ancillary equipment used in fixed or mobile industrial radiography, the irradiation of food or the processing of products by irradiation, which causes it to fail to de-energise at the end of the intended exposure period; or
    • equipment used in fixed or mobile industrial radiography or gamma irradiation, which causes a radioactive source to fail to return to its safe position by the normal means at the end of the intended exposure period. “radiation generator” means any electrical equipment emitting ionising radiation and containing components operating at a potential difference of more than 5kV
  • Breathing apparatus – malfunction in use or during testing immediately prior to use, where the malfunction causes or would have caused a significant risk of personal injury to the user
  • Diving operations - further details can be found in the Regulations or by contacting the University Health and Safety Advisor
  • Scaffolding - the complete or partial collapse (including falling, buckling or overturning) of a substantial part of any scaffold more than 5 metres in height, any supporting part of any slung or suspended scaffold which causes a working platform to fall (whether or not in use) or any part of any scaffold in circumstances such that there would be a significant risk of drowning to a person falling from the scaffold.
  • Trains - the collision of a train with any other train or vehicle which could have caused the death, or specified injury, of any person.
  • Wells - further details can be found in the Regulations or by contacting the University Health and Safety Advisor
  • Pipelines or pipeline works - any damage to, accidental or uncontrolled release from or inrush of anything into a pipeline, the failure of any pipeline isolation device, associated equipment or system or the failure of equipment involved with pipeline works, which could cause personal injury to any person, or which results in the pipeline being shut down for more than 24 hours. Also, the unintentional change in position of a pipeline, or in the subsoil or seabed in the vicinity, which requires immediate attention to safeguard the pipeline’s integrity or safety.
  • Structural collapse - the unintentional collapse or partial collapse of any structure, which involves a fall of more than 5 tonnes of material; or any floor or wall of any place of work, arising from, or in connection with, ongoing construction work (including demolition, refurbishment and maintenance), whether above or below ground. The unintentional collapse or partial collapse of any falsework.
  • Explosion or fire - any unintentional explosion or fire in any plant or premises which results in the stoppage of that plant, or the suspension of normal work in those premises, for more than 24 hours.
  • Release of flammable liquids and gases- the sudden, unintentional and uncontrolled release:
    • inside a building of 100 kilograms or more of a flammable liquid; of 10 kilograms or more of a flammable liquid at a temperature above its normal boiling point; of 10 kilograms or more of a flammable gas; or
    • in the open air, of 500 kilograms or more of a flammable liquid or gas.
  • Hazardous escapes of substances - the unintentional release or escape of any substance which could cause personal injury to any person other than through the combustion of flammable liquids or gases.