PhD Opportunities

Applications for funded and self-funded PhD research

We welcome applications for PhD study based on your research proposal and applications to studentships and self-funded projects based on our extensive, international research staff.

Funded studentships

We welcome applications from PhD research students and offer a number of fully funded PhD positions in the following areas. Funded research is a great way to get your research published with the support of a PhD scholarship. We also look for researchers to take part in a number of self-funded postgraduate research projects and to submit new research proposals.

Funded research is available in the areas of building and surveying, engineering and computing. The school carries out extensive research in partnership with industry, commerce and other academic institutions in the UK and overseas.

Self-funded opportunities

‌We are seeking postgraduate applications from highly qualified individuals in areas which fit with our own research expertise. Our self-funded PhDs can be offered in full-time, part-time and distance learning study mode.  Below is a list of project ideas but we welcome your own ideas that align with the broad themes of our expertise.

Self-funded PhD opportunities in Efficient Systems:

Algorithms for underwater optical communication

Big Data Streaming Analytics

Optimisation of a Cascade Chute  

Control and Protection of Networks

The Development of a Novel On-Line Mass Flow Meter

Energy Harvesting for Optical Wireless Communications

Emerging Technologies for Mobile Fashion Consumers

Modelling Feature Similarities in Software Product Lines

Personal Sensors in Clothing for Evaluating Air Pollution and its impact on Skin

Intelligent Self Explaining Systems

Social Signal Processing and Affective Computing

Software Design Pattern Recognition for Software Product Lines

Sounds of Intent: Serious Games

The Tipping Point in a Complex Product Line

Developing Personal Values through Computer Games

Thin-Walled Structural Members – A Complete Cold-Forming Computer Simulation

  

Self-funded PhD opportunities in Built Environment:

Desert Sand as the potential resource for the future

ECOCEMENTS – the future of sustainable constructions

The Conservation of Post-War Listed Buildings - Development of Low Carbon Repair Materials

Design and construction of a unique pilot plant

Propagation of Partial Discharge Pulses in High Voltage Apparatus

Eco-technological design for stability & resilience of transport infrastructure

Green infrastructure for adaptation to and resilience‌

Prevention of Construction Accidents & Ill Health through the Design Process

Stewarding water for sustainability

‌‌Sustainable use of vegetation‌

Synergetic effect of SAP and other chemical admixtures on high performance, fineSynergetic effect of SAP and other chemical admixtures on high performance, fine

Adaptive design of the UK dwellings to reduce summertime overheating

Redefining Cable Asset Life by Integrating Statistical Failure Models with Analy

Dean's Scholarships for International Academic Excellence

In the School of Computing, Engineering and Built Environment (CEBE) we believe that exceptional academic ability should be recognised and rewarded.

The Dean’s Scholarships offer the opportunity for outstanding research students to participate in some of the most exciting areas of interdisciplinary research carried out at the School.

To recognise academic achievement and to attract the best students from across the globe, the Dean is offering a range of scholarships towards course tuition fees for international (non-EU) fee-paying students with excellent academic qualifications.

The awards will be judged on a 1000 word statement supplied by each candidate that should state clearly how they meet the scholarship aims. Applicants demonstrate through their ideas how they would use their specific knowledge, experience and background to:

  • ensure that the research aims of their project are met and exceeded;
  • fully align their project with the School’s research strategy;
  • act as an ambassador for CEBE and GCU, and ensure dissemination and wider impact arising from their research work.

CEBE has up to three Dean’s Scholarships of £3,800 per year available for academically outstanding students who applied and have been accepted onto one of the School’s full time PhD Programmes. The Dean’s Scholarship can only be applied for at entry into the PhD research programme, and it is awarded for a total of three years pending annual renewal upon satisfactory performance.

For all successful applicants, the total scholarship will be awarded in the form of a partial fee-waiver against their annual fees.

Dean's scholarship application

HydroNation-funded PhD project

Project Description

Background 
The prescription of a medicine is the most common intervention in healthcare. However, pharmaceutical residues can enter the water environment where they pose a risk to aquatic organisms through chronic exposure (Kümmerer, 2010) and, in the case of antimicrobials, lead to increased antimicrobial resistance (Bengtsson-Palme et al., 2014), one of the most serious health concerns of our time. Medicines also account for 18% of NHS Scotland’s carbon footprint (NHS Scotland, 2009). 
There is an urgent need to reduce the reliance on pharmaceutical prescriptions, and a clear demand for alternative interventions. ‘Green prescribing’ in this context refers to a prescriber’s recommendation of engagement with the natural environment, which can have multiple benefits (Frumkin et al., 2017). From an environmental science perspective, ’green prescribing’ refers instead to the use of environmental criteria in pharmacological decision making. If several medicines of equal therapeutic benefit are available, the one with the least environmental impact is prescribed. In Sweden, this has been implemented successfully through the WISE list, a green formulary (prescribing guideline). 
The project links to two initiatives, each relating to one of these interpretations of green prescribing. Firstly, the Green Breakthrough Partnership (GBP) seeks to develop a green formulary for Scotland, modelled on the Swedish WISE list system, a first of its kind in the UK. Secondly, the ‘Our Natural Health Service’ initiative in Scotland seeks to include the use of nature-based health promotion initiatives and structured interventions into routine health and social care practice and reduce the pressure on NHS Scotland. The PhD has close links to the GBP through its supervisory team; Dr. Karin Helwig and Dr. Rachel Helliwell, as well as external advisor Sharon Pfleger. Dr. Kate Irvine has extensive expertise in nature-based health interventions and links to the Our Natural Health Service initiative with which the successful applicant would seek to connect. 
The PhD Project 
The project closes the loop between human and environmental health by testing the hypothesis that blue-green prescribing strategies offer an acceptable way to deliver positive health outcomes as part of a strategy to reduce our reliance on pharmaceuticals and thus their negative impact on the water environment. 
This PhD introduces a new concept, ‘blue-green prescribing’, to emphasize both the specific health benefits that water environments (e.g. rivers, coastline) can offer (see e.g. Van Tulleken, 2018) and the fact that the water environment is most significantly impacted by pharmaceuticals. The project would combine the use of medicine-free interventions and the use of environmental criteria into a proposal for blue-green prescribing guidelines for Scotland to deliver an integrated approach that benefits in tandem human and environmental health. 
Changes to prescribing policies will only happen if they are supported by NHS Scotland as an institution and can only be successful if they are supported by prescribers, patients and their representatives, and pharmacists, who may play a crucial role in developing a ‘blue-green formulary’. This project will therefore investigate the acceptability, in these key groups, of a prescribing policy that would lead to reduced reliance on medicines, reduced spending on medicines, avoided cost of advanced wastewater treatment, reduced adverse impacts from medicines on the environment, and potentially better overall patient outcomes. 
Supervision and training 
The project will be supervised by Dr. Karin Helwig (Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU)), Dr. Kate Irvine (James Hutton Institute (JHI)) and Dr. Rachel Helliwell (JHI). In addition, the proposal is supported by Sharon Pfleger, NHS Highland; Dr. Lesley Price, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Nursing and Community Health at GCU, and Dr. Judith Singleton, Lecturer Pharmacy at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia. This support will be invaluable in gaining insights into prescribing practices and in making contacts with patients, prescribers, pharmacists and the wider stakeholder group. The student will be hosted at GCU but may spend some time at JHI. Specific training for the PhD will include: (i) social science methods, including qualitative case study and quantitative survey methods and analysis; (ii); experimental design and data analysis; and (iii) pharmaceutical risk assessment. The student would be encouraged to discuss research plans and outcomes with other Hydronation Scholars and relevant projects within the Hydronation Programme. 

Funding Notes

The Hydro Nation Scholars Programme is an open competition for PhD Scholars to undertake approved projects, hosted within Scottish Universities and Research Institutes. Full funding is available from the Scottish Government (to host institutions via the Scottish Funding Council). The funding available will be in line with the UKRI doctoral stipend levels and indicative fees. Applicants should have a first-class honours degree in a relevant subject or a 2.1 honours degree plus Masters (or equivalent). Shortlisted A suitable background could be one or more of the following: pharmacy, public health, medicine, environmental science, sustainable development and social or behavioural sciences.

References

Bengtsson-Palme J, Boulund F, Fick J, Kristiansson E, Larsson DG (2014) Shotgun metagenomics reveals a wide array of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile elements in a polluted lake in India. Front Microbiol. 5:648. 
Frumkin H, Bratman BN, Breslow SJ, Cochran B, Kahn Jr PH, Lawler JJ, Levin PS, Tandon PS, Varanasi U, Wolf KL, and Wood SA (2017) Nature Contact and Human Health: A Research Agenda. Environmental Health Perspectives 125(7): 075001. 
Kümmerer K (2010) Pharmaceuticals in the Environment. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 35:1, 57-75 
NHS Scotland (2009) Carbon Footprint of NHSScotland (1990-2004). Online. Available from: http://www.hfs.scot.nhs.uk/news/?item=54 
Van Tulleken (2018) Open Water swimming as a treatment for major depressive disorder. BMJ Case Reports. bcr-2018-225007 

School of Computing, Engineering & Built Environment

 Project Title: Blue Green Prescribing for a Healthier Population and a Healthier Water Environment

 Project Reference Number:

 Key words:  ‘social prescribing’, ‘pharmaceutical pollution’, ‘green prescribing’

“The Hydro Nation Scholars Programme is an open competition for PhD Scholars to undertake approved projects, hosted within Scottish Universities and Research Institutes. Full funding is available from the Scottish Government (to host institutions via the Scottish Funding Council). The funding available will be in line with the UKRI doctoral stipend levels and indicative fees. Please note that potential candidates for this project should submit their application via https://www.findaphd.com/phds/project/blue-green-prescribing-for-a-healthier-population-and-a-healthier-water-environment/?p104940 and NOT via the GCU application process.”

 Project Summary

Background

The prescription of a medicine is the most common intervention in healthcare. However, pharmaceutical residues can enter the water environment where they pose a risk to aquatic organisms through chronic exposure (Kümmerer, 2010) and, in the case of antimicrobials, lead to increased antimicrobial resistance (Bengtsson-Palme et al., 2014), one of the most serious health concerns of our time. Medicines also account for 18% of NHS Scotland’s carbon footprint (NHS Scotland, 2009).

There is an urgent need to reduce the reliance on pharmaceutical prescriptions, and a clear demand for alternative interventions. ‘Green prescribing’ in this context refers to a prescriber’s recommendation of engagement with the natural environment, which can have multiple benefits (Frumkin et al., 2017). From an environmental science perspective, ’green prescribing’ refers instead to the use of environmental criteria in pharmacological decision making. If several medicines of equal therapeutic benefit are available, the one with the least environmental impact is prescribed. In Sweden, this has been implemented successfully through the WISE list, a green formulary (prescribing guideline).

The project links to two initiatives, each relating to one of these interpretations of green prescribing. Firstly, the Green Breakthrough Partnership (GBP) seeks to develop a green formulary for Scotland, modelled on the Swedish WISE list system, a first of its kind in the UK. Secondly, the ‘Our Natural Health Service’ initiative in Scotland seeks to include the use of nature-based health promotion initiatives and structured interventions into routine health and social care practice and reduce the pressure on NHS Scotland. The PhD has close links to the GBP through its supervisory team; Dr. Karin Helwig and Dr. Rachel Helliwell, as well as external advisor Sharon Pfleger. Dr. Kate Irvine has extensive expertise in nature-based health interventions and links to the Our Natural Health Service initiative with which the successful applicant would seek to connect.

The PhD Project

The project closes the loop between human and environmental health by testing the hypothesis that blue-green prescribing strategies offer an acceptable way to deliver positive health outcomes as part of a strategy to reduce our reliance on pharmaceuticals and thus their negative impact on the water environment.

This PhD introduces a new concept, ‘blue-green prescribing’, to emphasize both the specific health benefits that water environments (e.g. rivers, coastline) can offer (see e.g. Van Tulleken, 2018) and the fact that the water environment is most significantly impacted by pharmaceuticals. The project would combine the use of medicine-free interventions and the use of environmental criteria into a proposal for blue-green prescribing guidelines for Scotland to deliver an integrated approach that benefits in tandem human and environmental health.

Changes to prescribing policies will only happen if they are supported by NHS Scotland as an institution and can only be successful if they are supported by prescribers, patients and their representatives, and pharmacists, who may play a crucial role in developing a ‘blue-green formulary’. This project will therefore investigate the acceptability, in these key groups, of a prescribing policy that would lead to reduced reliance on medicines, reduced spending on medicines, avoided cost of advanced wastewater treatment, reduced adverse impacts from medicines on the environment, and potentially better overall patient outcomes.

Research Supervision and Training

The project will be supervised by Dr. Karin Helwig (Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU)), Dr. Kate Irvine (James Hutton Institute (JHI)) and Dr. Rachel Helliwell (JHI). In addition, the proposal is supported by Sharon Pfleger, NHS Highland; Dr. Lesley Price, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Nursing and Community Health at GCU, and Dr. Judith Singleton, Lecturer Pharmacy at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia. This support will be invaluable in gaining insights into prescribing practices and in making contacts with patients, prescribers, pharmacists and the wider stakeholder group. The student will be hosted at GCU but may spend some time at JHI. Specific training for the PhD will include: (i) social science methods, including qualitative case study and quantitative survey methods and analysis; (ii); experimental design and data analysis; and (iii) pharmaceutical risk assessment. The student would be encouraged to discuss research plans and outcomes with other Hydronation Scholars and relevant projects within the Hydronation Programme. Candidates are encouraged to contact the supervisory team via https://www.findaphd.com/phds/project/blue-green-prescribing-for-a-healthier-population-and-a-healthier-water-environment/?p104940

 Mode(s) of Study

The studentship is available as a 4 years full-time PhD.

 Eligibility

Applicants should have a first-class honours degree in a relevant subject or a 2.1 honours degree plus Masters (or equivalent). A suitable background for this project could be one or more of the following: pharmacy, public health, medicine, environmental science, sustainable development and social or behavioural sciences.

 Equivalent professional qualifications and any appropriate research experience may be considered. A minimum English language level of IELTS score of 6.5 (or equivalent) with no element below 6.0 is required. Some research disciplines may require higher levels.   

How to Apply

Candidates should access https://www.findaphd.com/phds/project/blue-green-prescribing-for-a-healthier-population-and-a-healthier-water-environment/?p104940 and request an application form via an email enquiry.

 The closing date for applications is Thursday, 31 January 2019.

Redefining Cable Asset Life by Integrating Statistical Failure Models with Analytical Models and Development of Risk-based Asset Replacement

Redefining Cable Asset Life by Integrating Statistical Failure Models with Analy

Redefining Cable Asset Life by Integrating Statistical Failure Models with Analytical Models and Development of Risk-based Asset Replacement Strategy