Mobile app delivers vital medical advice

26 January 2012

Mobile app delivers vital medical advice

iCEaid™ will soon be available on a range of mobile devices

Researchers teamed up with Lifesapps, a Scottish company that develops mobile products to protect, save and enhance lives. Its first product iCEaid is an intuitive medical know-how app powered by Dorling Kingsley’s best selling First Aid Manual, which was authorised by St John Ambulance, St Andrew’s First Aid and the British Red Cross.
iCEaid is designed to help in medical emergencies, such as mishaps at home, car accidents or sudden illness.
It is the brainchild of former army chief medical officer Andrew Mulford, who served in Kosovo and the Gulf.
He believes the app could prove vital to survival in an emergency because users can navigate quickly to the appropriate section and give medical treatment immediately. 
Dr Jon Sykes, Creative Technologies senior lecturer at GCU, said: “iCEaid really is a genius piece of kit. Users can ask it questions for a step-by-step first aid guide and link their friends’ medical details is tailored advice as well as generating a handover report for medics.
“We tried it out with a medical test group first, then with people off the street, putting it through a number of scenarios which tested every single aspect of the software. The reaction was overwhelmingly positive. 
“I believe everyone should have iCEaid on their phones, considering that it is expected to cost £6 for what is essentially a qualified first aider in your pocket at all times. It should be an essential piece of kit for hillwalkers and adventure sports enthusiasts, ambulance staff, those caring for the elderly and parents of young children, iCEaid lets people make decisions in an emergency that could save lives.”
As well as covering first aid basics, such as how to clear airwaves, iCEaid can provide more advanced information and users can programme it with their friends’ medical details in advance, meaning a more tailored medical approach should an emergency strike. 
The app also has a GPS that will guide users to the nearest hospital and the automatically generated handover report can be used by paramedics or doctors.  
A Sporting Chance Initiative STAR Award of £5,000 funded aspects of user and technical testing phase of its development, in a collaboration with GCU. The app was put through a series of trials in the university’s state-of-the-art technology suites, including stress tests by computing lecturer Peter Barrie and a useability assessment by Dr Sykes.
iCEaid™ will soon be available for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad, with an Android version in development. 

Experts at Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) have helped to develop the world’s first fully-integrated first aid system in an app to help people take action during a medical emergency.

Researchers teamed up with Lifesapps, a Scottish company that develops mobile products to protect, save and enhance lives.

Its first product iCEaid is an intuitive medical know-how app powered by Dorling Kingsley’s best selling First Aid Manual, which was authorised by St John Ambulance, St Andrew’s First Aid and the British Red Cross.

iCEaid is designed to help in medical emergencies, such as mishaps at home, car accidents or sudden illness.
It is the brainchild of former army chief medical officer Andrew Mulford, who served in Kosovo and the Gulf.

He believes the app could prove vital to survival in an emergency because users can navigate quickly to the appropriate section and give medical treatment immediately. 

Dr Jon Sykes, Creative Technologies senior lecturer at GCU, said: “iCEaid really is a genius piece of kit. Users can ask it questions for a step-by-step first aid guide and link their friends’ medical details is tailored advice as well as generating a handover report for medics.

“We tried it out with a medical test group first, then with people off the street, putting it through a number of scenarios which tested every single aspect of the software. The reaction was overwhelmingly positive. 

“I believe everyone should have iCEaid on their phones, considering that it is expected to cost £6 for what is essentially a qualified first aider in your pocket at all times. It should be an essential piece of kit for hillwalkers and adventure sports enthusiasts, ambulance staff, those caring for the elderly and parents of young children, iCEaid lets people make decisions in an emergency that could save lives.”

As well as covering first aid basics, such as how to clear airwaves, iCEaid can provide more advanced information and users can programme it with their friends’ medical details in advance, meaning a more tailored medical approach should an emergency strike. 

The app also has a GPS that will guide users to the nearest hospital and the automatically generated handover report can be used by paramedics or doctors.  

A Sporting Chance Initiative STAR Award of £5,000 funded aspects of user and technical testing phase of its development, in a collaboration with GCU.

The app was put through a series of trials in the university’s state-of-the-art technology suites, including stress tests by computing lecturer Peter Barrie and a useability assessment by Dr Sykes.

  • iCEaid™ will soon be available for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad, with an Android version in development
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